Our four year old daughter woke up like she always does–before the sun comes up and speaking in full 10 am voice. It’s our day to sleep in a little longer so we let her go downstairs to color, play, and continue to make noise while we try to squeeze in every ounce of rest before the little one hears the older one and wants to join in. Maybe you understand?

I couldn’t stay in bed. I kept hearing cupboards open and shut. I found Kirra coloring, she had already finished three pictures by the time I made it downstairs.

I prepared some cereal for her and a cup of tea for me. Turned on some music that while she ate and played.

Que the questions.

Kirra has been asking a lot of questions lately. I’m pretty sure this is a great sign that she’s growing developmentally but it’s also why I have these random grey hairs cropping up all over.

This morning was the most rapid fire questioning to date.

“Why do we have names?”

So people will be able to know who we are. (Hey, my best answer that early in the morning!)

“Why do people need to know who we are?”

“What does check-in mean?”

It means to sign in somewhere with your name.

“Why do we need to sign in?”

So everyone knows who is at a place.



“Why do we need to have name tags?”

“You thought having kids was a good idea. Why was it a good idea?”

“Why is daddy still sleeping?”

“Why is there music playing on your computer?”

Daddy and I were listening to this worship song last night.

“Why were you up last night?”

“Can I play with Play-doh?”



And there were more.

The thought I had while getting questioned by my sweet girl was this.



Why do we struggle with the question “why”?

A child is so unashamed to ask “why”.

A key question learned in a curriculum design and instructional development course I took was the question “Why do you do what you do when you do it?”

What if we walked around for an entire day asking “why”?

Why do I wake up in the mood I’m in?

Why do I eat what I eat?

Why do a think about what I think about?

Why am I worrying?

Why am I doing the busy work and avoid the important work?

Why am I avoiding that conversation?

Why haven’t I called or connected with those closes to me today?

Why am I obsessed with finding chocolate to eat at 2 PM.

Why do I love listening to music all the time?

Why do I read five books at once?

Why are people so important to me?

Why are we drawn to take this risk?

Why do I feel the need to clean out my closets?

Why does my husband constantly give things away?

Why is prayer something that I let get pushed by other thing?

Why does it bother us to pay so much for gas?

Why is it so much fun to play on the floor with children?

Why do I love hearing children pray?

Why does laughter make us feel better?

Why does hanging out with our neighbors give us life?

Why am I think about the question “why” today?

I think we we really answered this question and answered it honestly, many of us would find that we might be drifting into some unhealthy rhythms. We might find some really healthy things going on in our lives but we need to make room for more of them.

Ask yourself “why” this weekend. Why in your ministry. Why in your family. Why in your spiritual life. Why do you do what you do when you do it? It’s a question that would fare well when asked in community. Just like I’m helping Kirra see things from my angle, others can help us see things from theirs. It’s enlightening.

Make a list.

Question.

Share it with others.

You might find some important things along the way and enter into deeper rest, deeper purpose, and deeper passion for living.

Why is it a good idea to have kids?

Because they help us with our stuckness. They ask the right questions. They are very in touch with their feelings and emotions. They aren’t afraid to ask.

If you don’t have children–it becomes even more important to be a part of a community where children are included. We nurture them in many ways, but they equally contribute to the joys and learning that happens.

Thank you God–for Kirra–who isn’t afraid to keep asking “why”.

Pin It on Pinterest